The below categories are free to enter and require you meeting the below criteria. Please send your nominations to avawards@avmag.co.uk


This year we’ve hand picked an expert panel from the global AV industry to evaluate the entries and choose the winner.

Our panellists are;

Clive Couldwell, Editor, AV Magazine

Peter Lloyd, Editor, AV Magazine (1976-2008)

Mike Blackman, Managing Director, Integrated Systems Europe

David Labuskes, Chief Executive Officer, AVIXA

Graham Naylor-Smith, Associate Director, Ove Arup & Partners


Which company has made the biggest contribution to the AV market over the last 20 years?


Tell us why this company should win an award: outline why you’re entering this category and convince the judges why your entry should be considered.


How has this company moved the industry forward?


How has it innovated?: we’re looking for companies that demonstrate innovation in developing and bringing to market new concepts, products and solutions, and how they stand out from the competition. Innovation could also include working practices and corporate management initiatives, not just technology.


Product development: examples of customer success and technological innovation should be stated clearly. How are they delivering real benefits to the end user organisation in terms of improved efficiency, ROI, investment protection and cost reduction.  It would also be nice to see proper numbers and stats as evidence of growth.


Supporting material: video and/or bona fide testimonials supplied as text/pdf


Which has been the stand-out, game-changing technology of the past 20 years?


Brief explanation of product/environment: this should be clear, concise, devoid of waffle and marketing-speak.


Tell us why this product/environment should win an award: outline why you’re entering this category and convince the judges why your entry should be considered.


Evidence of technological innovation: this can be about spotting a game-changing product, or it may be a unique and groundbreaking approach to a tough or complex problem. It can be an interesting twist on an existing technology or a brand new development.


For example, does the product introduce new capabilities, or provide such significant improvements in standard capabilities to the degree that it stands out within its product category? Does it break new ground, redefine the category or define a new subcategory within the overall field?


How easily does the product integrate with other products - both from the same vendor and others? Can the product operate effectively in heterogeneous environments? Has the product been certified?


User benefit: this should describe how the product has enabled the ‘customer’ to win business, transform/improve internal processes, or any other ‘benefit’ defined/articulated by the customer.


Some points to consider: is the product easy to install? Are the product's interfaces intuitive? Are the product's functions clear, easy to learn and to run? Is the product likely to require the regular help of professional services? Does the product provide useful reports, audits, etc? Will the product scale smoothly to accommodate growth in an environment?


Does the product represent a cost-effective solution? Can the ROI be easily justified? If the product is expensive or represents an additional cost for most environments, is the added functionality worth the price? Will the product be cost effective to maintain (TCO)?


Commercial success: looks at how the vendor/manufacturer has measured the market impact of its product/technology. Sales may have gone through the roof or the product may have made a huge impact on a new market, for example. Ideally we’d like to see examples of customer demographics and perhaps some information about the entrant’s business.


Supporting material: this can take the form of video, and/or bona fide testimonials supplied as text/pdf